Blog Fundraising Insights

3 Surprising Observations About Millennial Giving

By: Trent Dunham, President

Wes Gay, Forbes Under 30 Contributor, recently wrote a white paper, ‘3 Keys to Successfully Engage Millennial Donors,’ to help charitable organizations further unpack the groundbreaking Millennial research released by Dunham+Company this spring.

Regarding the importance of Millennial engagement, Wes is crystal clear:

“Millennials are no longer the next generation; they’re the now generation. Those who want to thrive in the future must understand who this generation is today.”

Like most organizations, when it comes to understanding Millennials, you probably have more questions than answers. Questions like…

  • Who are Millennials and what values drive them?
  • What compels them to give and how do you engage their generosity?
  • Are there any barriers that frequently prevent Millennials from giving?

Recently, Wes and Rick Dunham, Dunham+Company CEO, hosted a webinar to discuss Wes’ white paper. And there were three surprising observations that stood out among the dozen or so points made during their 28-minute webinar:

  1. Despite overwhelming financial obstacles (crippling student loan debt, stagnant salaries, and rapidly rising cost of living), Millennials are surprisingly generous.
  2. Despite doom-and-gloom prognostication regarding the decline of religion in the U.S., a surprising 25% of Millennial givers attend a religious gathering weekly.
  3. Despite recent technology-centric marketing trends, Millennial donors are surprisingly receptive to traditional marketing strategies.

If your organization is looking to clarify the confusion surrounding Millennial donor engagement, I would encourage you to check out the webinar in its entirety today!

Get more insight in your inbox

Sign up below for fundraising insights, leading industry trends, and proprietary fundraising research.

Get more insight in your inbox

Sign up below for fundraising insights, leading industry trends, and proprietary fundraising research